A new book looking back on the last eight years of Fotografiska – Sweden’s trailblazing photography venue – is set for release later this month.

A new book looking back on the last eight years of Fotografiska – Sweden’s trailblazing photography venue – is set for release later this month.

For nearly a decade, Stockholm’s Fotografiska has been leading the charge of the world’s most progressive photography spaces. Attracting names like Annie Leibovitz, David LaChapelle and Helmut Newton, the venue has seen prodigious success since its opening in 2010, with plans to open offshoot branches in New York and London next spring.

To celebrate, Fotografiska is joining forces with teNeues to launch its own photo book this month. Titled The Eye, it will look back on eight years of groundbreaking, world-class photography that has been displayed at the venue.

“Our whole mission is to bring colour to the world, even if it’s in black and white,” explain the venue’s founders, Jan and Per Broman, in the book’s introduction. “It might sound pretentious but we truly want to make a difference, we believe that photography can change perception, and by that, the world, and we want to reach as many as possible in the process. That’s why we want to export Fotografiska to the world.”

The Eye will feature 250 carefully-selected images, including documentary, fashion and wildlife photography, as well as more abstract work. The shots will be interspersed with written testimonies reflecting on the original exhibitions, as well as quotes from the photographers.

Its release comes one year before the release of its New York and London venues – the latter of which is set to open in Whitechapel in spring 2019, with a full exhibition programme set to be announced in autumn.

“We have a very casual approach to what is considered trendy or fine and very keen to explore what is odd, crazy, misplaced,” the Bromans add. “We want to be pioneers in that regard. Questioning the traditional ways to do things, challenging the rules. We rather play by the book that is not yet written.”

Café Lehmitz by Anders Petersen, 1967 – 1970 © Anders Petersen / Courtesy of Jean-Kenta Cauthier

Café Lehmitz by Anders Petersen, 1967 – 1970 © Anders Petersen / Courtesy of Jean-Kenta Cauthier

Le lait miraculeux de la Vierge by Bettina Rheims, 1997 © Bettina RheimsCourtesy of Galerie Xippas

Le lait miraculeux de la Vierge by Bettina Rheims, 1997 © Bettina RheimsCourtesy of Galerie Xippas

Night 1. Night 6. Night 3. Night 5. Night 4. Night 2. by Charlotte Gyllenhammar © Charlotte Gyllenhammar © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2018

Night 1. Night 6. Night 3. Night 5. Night 4. Night 2. by Charlotte Gyllenhammar © Charlotte Gyllenhammar © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2018

Take Off by Roger Ballen, 2012 © Courtesy of Roger Ballen

Take Off by Roger Ballen, 2012 © Courtesy of Roger Ballen

Radioactive Cats by Sandy Skoglund, 1980 © Sandy Skoglund

Radioactive Cats by Sandy Skoglund, 1980 © Sandy Skoglund

Damien Hirst by Anton Corbijn, 2011 © Anton Corbijn

Damien Hirst by Anton Corbijn, 2011 © Anton Corbijn

Anastasia by Inez & Vinoodh, 1994 © Inez Van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin. Courtesy Gagosian

Anastasia by Inez & Vinoodh, 1994 © Inez Van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin. Courtesy Gagosian

Diva by Emma Svensson, 2016 © Emma Svensson

Diva by Emma Svensson, 2016 © Emma Svensson

Carmella Cureton, Atlantic City, NJ by Martin Schoeller, 2007 © Martin Schoeller

Carmella Cureton, Atlantic City, NJ by Martin Schoeller, 2007 © Martin Schoeller

Cover Inez and Vinoodh-2005 © Inez Van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin. Courtesy Gagosian

Cover Inez and Vinoodh-2005 © Inez Van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin. Courtesy Gagosian

The Eye is released on teNeues on May 18.

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