Posts By: Andrea Kurland

Learning to take photos that come from within

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I have been photographing in the Middle East and North Africa for as long as I have been a photographer. It has shaped who I am and determined the trajectory of my life up to this point. Events in the Middle East over the past 10-15 years have played an integral part in how the… Read more »

The people and places that make up modern Britain

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Back in 2011, Niall McDiarmid embarked on a six-year journey that would eventually see him visit over 200 towns across Britain. Somewhat perplexed by popular visual depictions of the isles – wistful, antiquated, grey – the Scottish photographer wanted to capture the country as he saw it: a modern, all-encompassing society, full of colour, character… Read more »

How do we talk about the abuses that we can’t name?

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2017 can be characterised as a year of backlash. While ‘Backlash’ as a collective action isn’t always viewed favourably, it can be useful – the best recent example being the viral #MeToo campaign, which raised women’s voices against sexual abuse, coalescing in a ferocious global community. But the movement wasn’t without flaws, and as a… Read more »

The show celebrating the best new women photographers

Street games by Agnieszka Maruszczyk, Poland

A new exhibition showcasing the best breakthrough talent in photography is currently on show at The Guardian News and Media Gallery in London. Women Behind the Lens, which runs until January 11th, focuses specifically on women in the industry. The show was thought up by the organisers behind Picfair – a new, open-to-all image library. Chosen photographers were selected by a… Read more »

Portraits that capture the spirit of modern America

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American photographer Stephen Shore, now 70, began his career as a child prodigy, getting his start at just 14 years old when Edward Steichen, then the director of the Department of Photography at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, acquired his work. Three years later, in 1965, he walked into Andy Warhol’s famed silver… Read more »

Lessons from Wes Anderson’s go-to cinematographer

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As a kid, Robert Yeoman always loved movies. Growing up in the northern suburbs of Chicago, he and his friends would make Saturday night pilgrimages to their local cinema. A single sitting of Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange upon its release in 1972 was enough to confirm what a young Robert already knew: “I walked… Read more »

A day in Wales with the real-life leader of the Jedis

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Holyhead is as North Wales as North Wales gets. Any further and you’ll find yourself paddling in the Irish Sea. Surrounded by mountains, hills, woodland and coast, it’s a geographical mishmash of a place; a town perched right on the end of the country as if by accident. Dominated by its port, ferries arrive like… Read more »

Striking portraits of human life in the wild

Evan sleeping at Camp 18, Juneau Icefield Research Program, Alaska. © Lucas Foglia, courtesy of Michael Hoppen Gallery, London.

On average, Americans spend 93 per cent of their lives indoors. The lack of exposure to the most basic elements of nature takes its toll, as we drift away from our true selves and adapt to the human-made world. To maintain this unnatural environment known as “progress,” we consume larger quantities of fossil fuels, adding… Read more »